In our latest video installment, The Blue Review interviewed three Mexican women artists who recently displayed their work in Boise as part of Mexico Week.

Alejandra Regalado


Alejandra Regalado

Alejandra Regalado showcased her “In Reference To, Mexican Women of Idaho & Oregon,” a portraiture series examining women. Photographer Monica Guerrero Mouret discussed “de Peregrina a Peregrina,” chronicling pilgrimages to the Basilica of the Virgin of Guadalupe. And Luz Camarena, creator of “Racial Epithet Vignettes,” offered an exploration of racism and oppression.

Monica Guerrero


Monica Guerrero

Their work explored powerful themes framed in modern Mexican and Mexican American culture, showcasing the values of Mexican women, faith, immigration and racism. Regalado, Mouret and Camarena each hoped to use art to challenge perceptions, impart understanding or spark a discussion. To deliver her message, Camarena employed a variety of different materials — including nails, and discarded scraps of wood.

“All the materials that I use here are materials that I found in the garbage. Disposable,” she said. “Because sometimes immigrants are treated as disposable people.” The Blue Review readers remember Regalado through a gallery of her portraits, “Mexican Women and The Things They Carry.

Luz Camarena

The arts played an important role as cultural envoy during Mexico Week in Boise, April 7-12. The inaugural event, presented by Boise State University and the Mexican Consulate in Idaho, included work from artists and scholars across the continent. Events and exhibitions spanned half a dozen venues, centered around a celebration and exploration of Mexican culture. Boise State professors Errol Jones and Mac Test helped bring the event to life.

For more from the artists themselves, click the video player below (or follow this YouTube link).

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The views and opinions expressed here are those of the writer and do not necessarily reflect those of Boise State University, the Center for Idaho History and Politics, or the School of Public Service.